Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/84051
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Type: Book chapter
Title: Feeding and swallowing disorders
Author: Rommel, N.
Omari, T.
Citation: Pediatric Neurogastroenterology: Gastrointestinal Motility and Functional Disorders in Children, 2013 / Faure, C., Di Lorenzo, C., Thapar, N. (ed./s), pp.217-226
Publisher: Springer
Publisher Place: United States
Issue Date: 2013
ISBN: 9781607617082
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Nathalie Rommel and Taher Omari
Abstract: Dysphagia is very common in the pediatric population within a wide range of disorders and hinders the provision of adequate nutrition, affecting growth and development and may lead to significant parental anxiety and family disruption. A variety of oropharyngeal swallowing disorders reported in newborns, infants and children are discussed in this chapter which does not intend to offer a complete classification of feeding problems in young children. Classifying feeding and swallowing problems is often difficult because of the fact that similar signs or symptoms may reflect different etiologies. Because of this lack of a one-to-one correspondence between clinical presentations and underlying causes of dysphagia, careful identification of symptoms, documentation of the underlying pharyngo-esophageal motility patterns and their relation to the mealtimes, is necessary to pinpoint the specific cause of a feeding or swallowing disorder. The main message of the chapter is that in assessing feeding and swallowing disorders, it is crucial to assess the biomechanics of swallow physiology in pharynx and esophagus using objective assessment techniques, regardless of the primary medical pathology. Linking clinical signs and symptoms to the objective dysphagic “signature” of the patient is the only way to achieve proper differential diagnosis of dysphagia and to provide effective treatment.
Rights: ©2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
RMID: 0020130025
DOI: 10.1007/978-1-60761-709-9_19
Appears in Collections:Paediatrics publications

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