Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/85537
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Cognitive and visual predictors of UFOV performance in older adults
Author: Matas, N.
Nettelbeck, T.
Burns, N.
Citation: Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2014; 70:74-83
Publisher: Elsevier Science
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0001-4575
1879-2057
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Nicole A. Matas, Ted Nettelbeck, Nicholas R. Burns
Abstract: Eighty two community dwelling older adults (52 females) aged 62-92 years (mean=75) completed a battery of cognitive and visual tests selected to assess functions relevant to driving performance. These were visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, general mental competence (Mini Mental State Examination, MMSE), processing speed (Inspection Time, IT), crowding across the visual field (Proficiency of Peripheral Vision Processing, ProPerVis) and change detection (DriverScan). These six tasks provided predictor variables for performance on the Useful Field of View test (UFOV), a well validated test of fitness to drive that includes subtests for (i) processing speed; (ii) divided attention; and (iii) selective attention. Relative importance regression analyses confirmed that UFOV is sensitive to attentional and speed processes but suggested that subtest (i) primarily reflects visual acuity and contrast sensitivity; subtest (ii) is better explained by change detection and processing speed; and subtest (iii) predominantly reflects crowding and contrast sensitivity. Unexpectedly, given no evidence of substantial cognitive decline, MMSE contributed significantly to performance on the more complex subtests (ii) and (iii).
Keywords: Useful Field of View Test; driving; older adults; attention; cognition; vision; inspection Time; processing speed; change detection
Rights: © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0020137584
DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2014.03.011
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.