Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/85969
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Type: Journal article
Title: Selective loss of carbohydrates from plant remains during coalification
Author: Wilson, M.A.
Verheyen, T.V.
Vassallo, A.M.
Hill, R.S.
Perry, G.J.
Citation: Organic Geochemistry, 1987; 11(4):265-271
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Issue Date: 1987
ISSN: 0146-6380
1873-5290
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Michael A. Wilson, T. Vincent Verheyen, Anthony M. Vassallo, Robert S. Hill, Geoff J. Perry
Abstract: Fossil leaves ofOleinites willsii, Banksieaephyllum angustum, associated organic matter and rhizomes ofGleichenia sp. isolated from Yallourn brown coal deposits, Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia and their living relatives have been analysed by high-resolution solid-state13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and pyrolysis—gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. The fossil leaves and rhizomes retain carbohydrates and, on a carbon basis, the amounts of carbohydrates in the fossil rhizomes and their living relatives appear to be similar. On the other hand, the amount of carbohydrates in the fossil leaves is substantially less than in the living relatives. The organic matter found intimately associated with the fossil leaves is quite different in structure from the fossil leaves themselves and bears a closer resemblance to humic acids and the smallest (<75μm) fractions of Yallourn brown coal. Since the fossil leaves are found in stratified beds, interfolded with associated organic matter, it is suggested that during coalification the leaves and associated organic matter undergo independent transformations and are brought together by water transport.
Keywords: Fossil leaves; fossil rhizomes; high-resolution solid-state13C-NMR spectroscopy; coal
Rights: Copyright © 1987 Pergamon Journals Ltd
RMID: 0030009340
DOI: 10.1016/0146-6380(87)90037-4
Appears in Collections:Ecology, Evolution and Landscape Science publications

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