Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/86285
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Type: Journal article
Title: A comparison of long-term outcome between Manchester Fothergill and vaginal hysterectomy as treatment for uterine descent
Author: Thys, S.
Coolen, A.
Martens, I.
Oosterbaan, H.
Roovers, J.
Mol, B.
Bongers, M.
Citation: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, 2011; 22(9):1171-1178
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Issue Date: 2011
ISSN: 0937-3462
1433-3023
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Susanne D. Thys, Anne- Lotte Coolen, Ingrid R. Martens, Herman P. Oosterbaan, Jan- Paul W. R. Roovers, Ben- Willem Mol, Marlies Y. Bongers
Abstract: Introduction and hypothesis: The objective of this study was to compare the Manchester Fothergill (MF) procedure with vaginal hysterectomy (VH) as surgical treatment of uterine descent. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent MF were matched for prolapse grade, age and parity to consecutive patients treated with VH. Evaluated outcomes included functional outcome, morbidity, recurrence of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and sexual function. Follow-up was performed using validated questionnaires. Results: We included 196 patients (98 patients per group). The response rate after a follow-up of 4–9 years was 80%. We found no differences in functional outcome and recurrence rates of POP between groups. Blood loss was significantly less and operating time was significantly shorter in the MF group. However, incomplete emptying of the bladder was more common in the MF group. Conclusions: The MF procedure is equally effective to the VH and should be considered as a surgical option that allows preservation of the uterus.
Keywords: Manchester Fothergill; Pelvic organ prolapse; Recurrence; Apical compartment; Vaginal hysterectomy
Rights: © The International Urogynecological Association 2011
DOI: 10.1007/s00192-011-1422-3
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 2
Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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