Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/86829
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Type: Journal article
Title: Successful vaccines for naturally occurring protozoal diseases of animals should guide human vaccine research. A review of protozoal vaccines and their designs
Author: Mcallister, M.
Citation: Parasitology, 2014; 141(5):624-640
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0031-1820
1469-8161
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Milton M. McAllister
Abstract: Effective vaccines are available for many protozoal diseases of animals, including vaccines for zoonotic pathogens and for several species of vector-transmitted apicomplexan haemoparasites. In comparison with human diseases, vaccine development for animals has practical advantages such as the ability to perform experiments in the natural host, the option to manufacture some vaccines in vivo, and lower safety requirements. Although it is proper for human vaccines to be held to higher standards, the enduring lack of vaccines for human protozoal diseases is difficult to reconcile with the comparatively immense amount of research funding. Common tactical problems of human protozoal vaccine research include reliance upon adapted rather than natural animal disease models, and an overwhelming emphasis on novel approaches that are usually attempted in replacement of rather than for improvement upon the types of designs used in effective veterinary vaccines. Currently, all effective protozoal vaccines for animals are predicated upon the ability to grow protozoal organisms. Because human protozoal vaccines need to be as effective as animal vaccines, researchers should benefit from a comparison of existing veterinary products and leading experimental vaccine designs. With this in mind, protozoal vaccines are here reviewed.
Keywords: Protozoal diseases; animal models of human disease; apicomplexa; attenuation; efficacy; malaria; one medicine; review; vaccination
Rights: © Cambridge University Press 2014. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
RMID: 0030012124
DOI: 10.1017/S0031182013002060
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

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