Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/87533
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Type: Journal article
Title: Cell-cell communication between malaria-infected red blood cells via exosome-like vesicles
Author: Regev-Rudzki, N.
Wilson, D.
Carvalho, T.
Sisquella, X.
Coleman, B.
Rug, M.
Bursac, D.
Angrisano, F.
Gee, M.
Hill, A.
Baum, J.
Cowman, A.
Citation: Cell, 2013; 153(5):1120-1133
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 0092-8674
1097-4172
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Neta Regev-Rudzki, Danny W. Wilson, Teresa G. Carvalho, Xavier Sisquella, Bradley M. Coleman, Melanie Rug, Dejan Bursac, Fiona Angrisano, Michelle Gee, Andrew F. Hill, Jake Baum, Alan F. Cowman
Abstract: Cell-cell communication is an important mechanism for information exchange promoting cell survival for the control of features such as population density and differentiation. We determined that Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells directly communicate between parasites within a population using exosome-like vesicles that are capable of delivering genes. Importantly, communication via exosome-like vesicles promotes differentiation to sexual forms at a rate that suggests that signaling is involved. Furthermore, we have identified a P. falciparum protein, PfPTP2, that plays a key role in efficient communication. This study reveals a previously unidentified pathway of P. falciparum biology critical for survival in the host and transmission to mosquitoes. This identifies a pathway for the development of agents to block parasite transmission from the human host to the mosquito.
Keywords: Erythrocytes
Microtubules
Animals
Humans
Culicidae
Plasmodium falciparum
Malaria, Falciparum
Actins
Cell Communication
Signal Transduction
Drug Resistance
Plasmids
Trophozoites
Exosomes
Rights: © 2013 Elsevier Inc.
DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.04.029
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 2
Molecular and Biomedical Science publications

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