Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/8757
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Type: Journal article
Title: Effect of high-dose chemotherapy on intestinal permeability in humans.
Author: Keefe, D.
Cummins, A.
Dale, B.
Kotasek, D.
Robb, T.
Sage, R.
Citation: Clinical Science, 1997; 92(4):385-389
Publisher: PORTLAND PRESS LTD
Issue Date: 1997
ISSN: 0143-5221
1470-8736
Statement of
Responsibility: 
D. M. K. Keefe, A. G. Cummins, B. M. Dale, D. Kotasek, T. A. Robb and R. E. Sage
Abstract: 1. Mucositis is a common side-effect of chemotherapy which is difficult to assess except by invasive means such as upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Differential absorption of mono- and di-saccharides, such as rhamnose and lactulose, is a non-invasive measure of intestinal damage. 2. The purpose of the study was to assess the duration and severity of intestinal damage in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous blood stem-cell transplantation for malignant disease. 3. Thirty-five patients were studied before treatment and at 7, 28, 60 and 90 days after treatment. 4. The median lactulose/rhamnose ratios before treatment and at 7 and 90 days post-treatment were 0.09, 0.62 and 0.06 respectively. Altered permeability was due to both increased lactulose permeation and decreased rhamnose absorption. These abnormalities suggest a defect in tight-junction integrity as well as a decrease in surface area of small bowel. 5. We conclude that chemotherapy given for malignant disease is associated with a transient abnormality in intestinal sugar permeability, which peaks at 7 days after treatment and is composed of both mono- and di-saccharide absorption abnormalities.
Keywords: chemotherapy
intestinal permeability
mucositis
Rights: © 1997 The Biochemical Society and the Medical Research Society
DOI: 10.1042/cs0920385
Published version: http://www.clinsci.org/cs/092/cs0920385.htm
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