Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/89077
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Type: Journal article
Title: Influence of soil particle size on the measurement of sodium by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy
Author: Cozzolino, D.
Moron, A.
Citation: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, 2010; 41(19):2330-2339
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0010-3624
1532-2416
Statement of
Responsibility: 
D. Cozzolino, A. Morón
Abstract: This study evaluates the effect of soil particle size (SPS) on the measurement of exchangeable sodium (Na) (EXC-Na) by near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy. Three hundred thirty-two (n = 332) top soil samples (0–10 cm) were taken from different locations across Uruguay, analyzed by EXC-Na using emission spectrometry, and scanned in reflectance using a NIR spectrophotometer (1100–2500 nm). Partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) models between reference chemical data and NIR data were developed using cross validation (leaving one out). The coefficient of determination in calibration (R2) and the root mean square of the standard error of cross validation (RMSECV) for EXC-Na concentration were 0.44 (RMSECV: 0.12 mg kg–1) for soil with small particle size (SPS-0.053) and 0.77 (RMSECV: 0.09 mg kg–1) for soils with particle sizes greater than 0.212 mm (SPS-0.212), using the NIR region after second derivative as mathematical transformation. The R2 and RMSECV for EXC-Na concentration using PCR were 0.54 (RMSECV: 0.07 mg kg–1) and 0.80 (RMSECV: 0.03 mg kg–1) for SPS-0.053 and SPS-0.212 samples, respectively.
Keywords: Arable soil
exchangeable Na
near-infrared reflectance
partial least squares
principal component regression spectroscopy
visible
Rights: Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
DOI: 10.1080/00103624.2010.508097
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications
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