Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/90834
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Type: Journal article
Title: Paternal education status significantly influences infants’ measles vaccination uptake, independent of maternal education status
Author: Rammohan, A.
Awofeso, N.
Fernandez, R.
Citation: BMC Public Health, 2012; 12(1):336-1-336-7
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1471-2458
1471-2458
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Anu Rammohan, Niyi Awofeso, and Renae C Fernandez
Abstract: Background: Despite increased funding of measles vaccination programs by national governments and international aid agencies, structural factors encumber attainment of childhood measles immunisation to levels which may guarantee herd immunity. One of such factors is parental education status. Research on the links between parental education and vaccination has typically focused on the influence of maternal education status. This study aims to demonstrate the independent influence of paternal education status on measles immunisation. Methods: Comparable nationally representative survey data were obtained from six countries with the highest numbers of children missing the measles vaccine in 2008. Logistic regression analysis was applied to examine the influence of paternal education on uptake of the first dose of measles vaccination, independent of maternal education, whilst controlling for confounding factors such as respondent’s age, urban/rural residence, province/state of residence, religion, wealth and occupation. Results: The results of the analysis show that even if a mother is illiterate, having a father with an education of Secondary (high school) schooling and above is statistically significant and positively correlated with the likelihood of a child being vaccinated for measles, in the six countries analysed. Paternal education of secondary or higher level was significantly and independently correlated with measles immunisation uptake after controlling for all potential confounders. Conclusions: The influence of paternal education status on measles immunisation uptake was investigated and found to be statistically significant in six nations with the biggest gaps in measles immunisation coverage in 2008. This study underscores the imperative of utilising both maternal and paternal education as screening variables to identify children at risk of missing measles vaccination prospectively.
Keywords: Humans
Measles
Measles Vaccine
Vaccination
Health Surveys
Logistic Models
Case-Control Studies
Parents
Fathers
Mothers
Social Class
Child, Preschool
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Rural Population
Urban Population
Educational Status
Africa
Asia
Female
Male
Rights: © 2012 Rammohan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-336
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 7
Paediatrics publications

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