Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/91697
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Type: Journal article
Title: Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 7 years' corrected age in preterm infants who were fed high-dose docosahexaenoic acid to term equivalent: a follow-up of a randomised controlled trial
Author: Collins, C.
Gibson, R.
Anderson, P.
McPhee, A.
Sullivan, T.
Gould, J.
Ryan, P.
Doyle, L.
Davis, P.
McMichael, J.
French, N.
Colditz, P.
Simmer, K.
Morris, S.
Makrides, M.
Citation: BMJ Open, 2015; 5(3):e007314-1-e007314-11
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 2044-6055
2044-6055
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Carmel T Collins, Robert A Gibson, Peter J Anderson, Andrew J McPhee, Thomas R Sullivan, Jacqueline F Gould, Philip Ryan, Lex W Doyle, Peter G Davis, Judy E McMichael, Noel P French, Paul B Colditz, Karen Simmer, Scott A Morris, Maria Makrides
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if improvements in cognitive outcome detected at 18 months' corrected age (CA) in infants born <33 weeks' gestation receiving a high-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) compared with standard-DHA diet were sustained in early childhood. DESIGN: Follow-up of a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Randomisation was stratified for sex, birth weight (<1250 vs ≥1250 g) and hospital. SETTING: Five Australian tertiary hospitals from 2008 to 2013. PARTICIPANTS: 626 of the 657 participants randomised between 2001 and 2005 were eligible to participate. INTERVENTIONS: High-DHA (≈1% total fatty acids) enteral feeds compared with standard-DHA (≈0.3% total fatty acids) from age 2-4 days until term CA. PRIMARY OUTCOME: Full Scale IQ of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) at 7 years CA. Prespecified subgroup analyses based on the randomisation strata (sex, birth weight) were conducted. RESULTS: 604 (92% of the 657 originally randomised) consented to participate (291 high-DHA, 313 standard-DHA). To address missing data in the 604 consenting participants (22 for primary outcome), multiple imputation was performed. The Full Scale IQ was not significantly different between groups (high-DHA 98.3, SD 14.0, standard-DHA 98.5, SD 14.9; mean difference adjusted for sex, birthweight strata and hospital -0.3, 95% CI -2.9 to 2.2; p=0.79). There were no significant differences in any secondary outcomes. In prespecified subgroup analyses, there was a significant sex by treatment interaction on measures of parent-reported executive function and behaviour. Scores were within the normal range but girls receiving the high-DHA diet scored significantly higher (poorer outcome) compared with girls receiving the standard-DHA diet. CONCLUSIONS: Supplementing the diets of preterm infants with a DHA dose of approximately 1% total fatty acids from days 2-4 until term CA showed no evidence of benefit at 7 years' CA. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12606000327583.
Keywords: Neonatology; Nutrition & Dietetics; Public Health
Rights: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007314
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1046207
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/628371
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1059111
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/511117
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1061704
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 2
Paediatrics publications

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