Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/93060
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dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane, A.-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationAustralasian Psychiatry, 2015; 23(4):392-395-
dc.identifier.issn1440-1665-
dc.identifier.issn1440-1665-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/93060-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: This paper outlines the substantial stigmatization of soldiers who suffered psychiatric disorders during World War I, and how there was little acceptance of the enduring impact of prolonged combat exposure once the war ended. CONCLUSION: Recent decades of research highlight the delayed impact of combat exposure and its long-term neurobiological consequences.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAlexander C McFarlane-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherSAGE-
dc.rights© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015-
dc.subjectPTSD-
dc.subjectWorld War I-
dc.subjectneurobiology-
dc.subjectdelayed onset-
dc.subjectcumulative exposure-
dc.titleOne hundred years of lessons about the impact of war on mental health; two steps forward, one step back-
dc.typeJournal article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1039856215588211-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
dc.identifier.orcidMcFarlane, A. [0000-0002-3829-9509]-
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