Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/93300
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Type: Journal article
Title: Forecasts of habitat suitability improve habitat corridor efficacy in rapidly changing environments
Author: Gregory, S.
Ancrenaz, M.
Brook, B.
Goossens, B.
Alfred, R.
Ambu, L.
Fordham, D.
Citation: Diversity and Distributions: a journal of conservation biogeography, 2014; 20(9):1044-1057
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 1366-9516
1472-4642
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Stephen D. Gregory, Marc Ancrenaz, Barry W. Brook, Benoit Goossens, Raymond Alfred, Laurentius N. Ambu, and Damien A. Fordham
Abstract: Habitat fragmentation threatens species’ persistence by increasing subpopulation isolation and vulnerability to stochastic events, and its impacts are expected to worsen under climate change. By reconnecting isolated fragments, habitat corridors should dampen the synergistic impacts of habitat and climate change on population viability. Choosing which fragments to reconnect is typically informed by past and current environmental conditions. However, habitat and climate are dynamic and change over time. Habitat suitability projections could inform fragment selection using current and future conditions, ensuring that corridors connect persistent fragments. We compare the efficacy of using current-day and future forecasts of breeding habitat to inform corridor placement under land cover and climate-change mitigation and no mitigation scenarios by evaluating their influence on subpopulation abundance, and connectivity and long-term metapopulation abundance. Our case study is the threatened orangutan metapopulation in Sabah.
Rights: © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
DOI: 10.1111/ddi.12208
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1096427
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT100100200
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FS110200051
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 2
Earth and Environmental Sciences publications

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