Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/9410
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Type: Journal article
Title: Effects of acute hyperglycaemia on anorectal motor and sensory function in diabetes mellitus
Author: Russo, A.
Botten, R.
Kong, M.
Chapman, I.
Fraser, R.
Horowitz, M.
Sunt, W.
Citation: Diabetic Medicine, 2004; 21(2):176-182
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0742-3071
1464-5491
Statement of
Responsibility: 
A. Russo, R. Botten, M.-F. Kong, I. M. Chapman, R. J. L. Fraser, M. Horowitz and W.-M. Sun
Abstract: AIMS: To determine the effects of acute hyperglycaemia on anorectal motor and sensory function in patients with diabetes mellitus. METHODS: In eight patients with Type 1, and 10 patients with Type 2 diabetes anorectal motility and sensation were evaluated on separate days while the blood glucose concentration was stabilized at either 5 mmol/l or 12 mmol/l using a glucose clamp technique. Eight healthy subjects were studied under euglycaemic conditions. Anorectal motor and sensory function was evaluated using a sleeve/sidehole catheter, incorporating a barostat bag. RESULTS: In diabetic subjects hyperglycaemia was associated with reductions in maximal (P<0.05) and plateau (P<0.05) anal squeeze pressures and the rectal pressure/volume relationship (compliance) during barostat distension (P<0.01). Hyperglycaemia had no effect on the perception of rectal distension. Apart from a reduction in rectal compliance (P<0.01) and a trend (P=0.06) for an increased number of spontaneous anal sphincter relaxations, there were no differences between the patients studied during euglycaemia when compared with healthy subjects. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with diabetes, acute hyperglycaemia inhibits external anal sphincter function and decreases rectal compliance, potentially increasing the risk of faecal incontinence.
Keywords: anorectal motility; hyperglycaemia; faecal incontinence
Description: © 2004 Diabetes UK. Diabetic Medicine. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
RMID: 0020040153
DOI: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2004.01106
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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