Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/94496
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Treatments for anxiety and depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a literature review
Author: Cafarella, P.
Effing, T.
Usmani, Z.
Frith, P.
Citation: Respirology, 2012; 17(4):627-638
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1323-7799
1440-1843
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Paul A. Cafarella, Tanja W. Effing, Zafar-Ahmad Usmani, and Peter A. Frith
Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious contemporary health issue. Psychological co-morbidities such as anxiety and depression are common in COPD. Current evidence for treatment options to reduce anxiety and depression in patients with COPD was examined. There is evidence available for the efficacy of pharmacological treatments, cognitive behavioural therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, relaxation therapy and palliative care in COPD. Therapeutic modalities that have not been proven effective in decreasing anxiety and depression in COPD, but which have theoretical potential among patients, include interpersonal psychotherapy, self-management programmes, more extensive disease management programmes, supportive therapy and self-help groups. Besides pulmonary rehabilitation that is only available for a small percentage of patients, management guidelines make scant reference to other options for the treatment of mental health problems. The quantity and quality of research on mental health treatments in COPD have historically been insufficient to support their inclusion in COPD treatment guidelines. In this review, recommendations regarding assessment, treatment and future research in this important field were made.
Keywords: anxiety; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; depression; review; therapy
Rights: © 2012 The Authors
RMID: 0030026857
DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2012.02148.x
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.