Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/95356
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Type: Journal article
Title: Optimizing the measurement of colostrum antibody concentrations for identifying BVDV persistently infected calves
Author: Jenvey, C.
Reichel, M.
Lanyon, S.
Cockcroft, P.
Citation: Veterinary Sciences, 2015; 2(1):26-31
Publisher: MDPI AG
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 2306-7381
2306-7381
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Caitlin J. Jenvey, Michael P. Reichel, Sasha R. Lanyon and Peter D. Cockcroft
Abstract: Colostrum contains substantially higher concentrations of immunoglobulins compared to serum, which may help to improve the utility of diagnostic tests. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of colostrum antibody concentrations in identifying Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) PI (persistently infected) calf carrying beef heifers following an experimental infection. Colostrum was collected within 12 hours of parturition and tested in undiluted, 1:5, 1:10, 1:100, 1:200, and 1:500 dilutions using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for BVDV antibody. Cows were determined to be carrying a PI calf based on positive quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction and antigen ELISA result on pre-colostral serum and ear notch samples collected from their calf. The median ELISA sample-to-positive (S/P) ratio for colostrum collected from heifers that carried a PI calf were significantly higher than the median ELISA S/P ratio for colostrum collected from heifers that did not carry a PI calf at dilutions of 1:100, 1:200, and 1:500. This study provides further evidence for increased antigenic stimulation in utero by the BVDV viraemic PI calf, which can also be identified with 100% diagnostic sensitivity when using 1:500 dilution colostrum.
Keywords: BVDV; colostrum; ELISA; PI calves
Rights: © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
RMID: 0030029247
DOI: 10.3390/vetsci2010026
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

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