Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/95525
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Type: Journal article
Title: Maternal obesity or weight loss around conception impacts hepatic fatty acid metabolism in the offspring
Author: Nicholas, L.
Rattanatray, L.
Morrison, J.
Kleemann, D.
Walker, S.
Zhang, S.
MacLaughlin, S.
McMillen, I.
Citation: Obesity, 2014; 22(7):1685-1693
Publisher: North American Association for the Study of Obesity
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 1930-7381
1930-739X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Lisa M. Nicholas, Leewen Rattanatray, Janna L. Morrison, David O. Kleemann, Simon K. Walker, Song Zhang, Severence MacLaughlin and I. Caroline McMillen
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of maternal obesity or weight loss during the periconceptional period on programming of lipid metabolism in the liver of the offspring. METHODS: An embryo transfer model was used to investigate the effects of exposure to either maternal obesity and/or weight loss before and for 1-week post-conception on the abundance of key molecules regulating hepatic fatty acid oxidation and lipid synthesis in the 4-month-old lamb. RESULTS: Periconceptional maternal obesity resulted in decreased hepatic PPARα, PGC1α and GCN5 abundance and increased hepatic SIRT1 and AMPKα1, AMPKα2 and SREBP1 abundance in the offspring. Maternal weight loss in obese ewes did not ablate all of these effects of maternal obesity on hepatic metabolism in the lamb. Weight loss in normal weight ewes also resulted in decreased hepatic PGC1α and GCN5 and increased AMPKα2 abundance in the offspring. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure of the oocyte/embryo to either maternal obesity or weight loss during the periconceptional period has long term consequences for hepatic lipid metabolism. These findings highlight the sensitivity of the early embryo to maternal nutrition and the need for dietary interventions which maximize metabolic benefits and minimize metabolic costs for the next generation.
Keywords: Animals
Description: Article first published online: 10 APR 2014
Rights: © 2014 The Obesity Society
RMID: 0030023980
DOI: 10.1002/oby.20752
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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