Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/96519
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Type: Journal article
Title: Histamine H₄ receptors in the gastrointestinal tract
Other Titles: Histamine H(4) receptors in the gastrointestinal tract
Author: Deiteren, A.
De Man, J.
Pelckmans, P.
De Winter, B.
Citation: British Journal of Pharmacology, 2015; 172(5):1165-1178
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 0007-1188
1476-5381
Statement of
Responsibility: 
A Deiteren, J G De Man, P A Pelckmans and B Y De Winter
Abstract: Histamine is a well-established mediator involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and exerts its effect through activation of four histamine receptors (H₁-H₄). The histamine H₄ receptor is the newest member of this histamine receptor family, and is expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract as well as in the liver, pancreas and bile ducts. Functional studies using a combination of selective and non-selective H₄ receptor ligands have rapidly increased our knowledge of H₄ receptor involvement in gastrointestinal processes both under physiological conditions and in models of disease. Strong evidence points towards a role for H₄ receptors in the modulation of immune-mediated responses in gut inflammation such as in colitis, ischaemia/reperfusion injury, radiation-induced enteropathy and allergic gut reactions. In addition, data have emerged implicating H₄ receptors in gastrointestinal cancerogenesis, sensory signalling, and visceral pain as well as in gastric ulceration. These studies highlight the potential of H₄ receptor targeted therapy in the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and cancer.
Keywords: Gastrointestinal Tract; Animals; Humans; Receptors, Histamine
Rights: © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society
RMID: 0030036972
DOI: 10.1111/bph.12989
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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