Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/96752
Type: Report
Title: Innovation and change in new ventures
Author: Davidsson, P.
Gordon, S.R.
Publisher: Queensland University of Technology
Issue Date: 2013
Series/Report no.: Business Creation in Australia, Paper #3
ISBN: 9781921897870
Assignee: Department of Industry
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Per Davidsson, Scott R. Gordon
Abstract: This paper examines the innovativeness of nascent and young entrepreneurial firms in Australia. Findings of interest in this paper include: ? The vast majority of new ventures offer some degree of innovation in some aspect of their business, be it the product, the process, their market selection or their marketing approach. ? With close to 75 per cent claiming they do more than taking mere imitations to the market, novelty in the product/service is the type of innovation most commonly offered by start-up firms. ? The innovativeness of start-ups varies by industry. Construction start-ups stand out as particularly low in innovation across all indicators, while Manufacturing stands out the most in the positive direction. ? Team start-ups other than spouse teams have higher novelty, as do ventures started by founders with prior start-up experience. ? There is no association between the founders’ level of education and the novelty of the ventures they (try to) create.
Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Nascent Entrepreneurship; Business Start-Up; New Venture Creation; Business Creation in Australia; Australian Entrepreneurship; Entrepreneur Statistics; Innovation; Technology; Business Adaptation; Venture Creation Process; Comprehensive Australian Study of Entrepreneurial Emergence; CAUSEE; Per Davidsson; Scott Gordon
Rights: © 2013 Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research
RMID: 0030039314
Published version: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/62931/
Appears in Collections:Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation, and Innovation Centre publications

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