Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/96793
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Type: Journal article
Title: Including adaptation and mitigation responses to climate change in a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm framework for urban water supply systems incorporating GHG emissions
Author: Paton, F.
Maier, H.
Dandy, G.
Citation: Water Resources Research, 2014; 50(8):6285-6304
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0043-1397
1944-7973
Statement of
Responsibility: 
F. L. Paton, H. R. Maier, and G. C. Dandy
Abstract: Cities around the world are increasingly involved in climate action and mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, in the context of responding to climate pressures in the water sector, very few studies have investigated the impacts of changing water use on GHG emissions, even though water resource adaptation often requires greater energy use. Consequently, reducing GHG emissions, and thus focusing on both mitigation and adaptation responses to climate change in planning and managing urban water supply systems, is necessary. Furthermore, the minimization of GHG emissions is likely to conflict with other objectives. Thus, applying a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA), which can evolve an approximation of entire trade-off (Pareto) fronts of multiple objectives in a single run, would be beneficial. Consequently, the main aim of this paper is to incorporate GHG emissions into a MOEA framework to take into consideration both adaptation and mitigation responses to climate change for a city’s water supply system. The approach is applied to a case study based on Adelaide’s southern water supply system to demonstrate the framework’s practical management implications. Results indicate that trade-offs exist between GHG emissions and risk-based performance, as well as GHG emissions and economic cost. Solutions containing rainwater tanks are expensive, while GHG emissions greatly increase with increased desalinated water supply. Consequently, while desalination plants may be good adaptation options to climate change due to their climate-independence, rainwater may be a better mitigation response, albeit more expensive.
Rights: © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
RMID: 0030014090
DOI: 10.1002/2013WR015195
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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