Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/96903
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Type: Journal article
Title: Polymorphisms in the fibrinolytic pathway genes and the risk of recurrent spontaneous abortion
Author: Andraweera, P.
Dekker, G.
Thompson, S.
Nowak, R.
Jayasekara, R.
Dissanayake, V.
Roberts, C.
Citation: Reproductive BioMedicine Online, 2014; 29(6):745-751
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 1472-6483
1472-6491
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Responsibility: 
Prabha H Andraweera, Gustaaf A Dekker, Steven D Thompson, Rachael C Nowak, Rohan W Jayasekara, Vajira HW Dissanayake, Claire T Roberts
Abstract: Impaired fibrinolytic activity is implicated in the pathogenesis of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). This case-control study assessed the prevalence of polymorphisms in fibrinolytic system genes in RSA. Cases comprised 202 Sinhalese women who had experienced at least two first-trimester spontaneous abortions and had no living children; controls were 202 women with no history of spontaneous abortion and two or more living children. The groups were matched for age and ethnicity. DNA was genotyped using the Sequenom MassARRAY system. The PLAUR rs4251923 A (OR 95% CI 2.3 [1.3 to 4.0]), SERBP2 rs6098 A (OR 95% CI 1.4 [1.1 to 1.9]) and SERBP2 rs6103 C alleles (OR 95% CI 1.4 [1.1 to 1.9]) were increased in the RSA group compared with controls. The prevalence of PLAUR rs4251923/ SERBP2 rs6098/ SERBP2 rs6103 GG/AA/CC (OR 95% CI 2.4 [1.2 to 4.9], GA/GA/GC(OR 95% CI 3.9 [1.3 to 11.2]), GA/AA/CC (OR 95% CI 2.9 [1.0 to 8.6] and GA/GG/GG (OR 95% CI 21.3 [1.1 to 410.3]) genotypes were also increased in cases. Poly- morphisms in the fibrinolytic system genes are associated with RSA in Sinhalese women. These likely impair implantation.
Keywords: Fibrinolytic pathway; gene; miscarriage; polymorphism; pregnancy
Rights: © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd.
RMID: 0030015489
DOI: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2014.08.014
Appears in Collections:Medical Sciences publications

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