Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/97490
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dc.contributor.authorKaur, B.en
dc.contributor.authorCarberry, A.en
dc.contributor.authorHogan, N.en
dc.contributor.authorRoberton, D.en
dc.contributor.authorBeilby, J.en
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Medical Education, 2014; 14(1):180-1-180-10en
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920en
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/97490-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Global medical workforce requirements highlight the need for effective workforce planning, with the overall aims being to alleviate doctor shortages and prevent maldistribution. The Medical Schools Outcomes Database and Longitudinal Tracking (MSOD) Project provides a foundation for evaluating outcomes of medical education programs against specified workforce objectives (including rural and areas of workforce needs), assisting in medical workforce planning, and provision of a national research resource. This paper describes the methodology and baseline results for the MSOD project. METHODS The MSOD Project is a prospective longitudinal multiple-cohort study. The project invites all commencing and completing Australian medical students to complete short questionnaires. Participants are then asked to participate in four follow-up surveys at 1, 3, 5 and 8 years after graduation. RESULTS Since 2005, 30,635 responses for medical students (22,126 commencing students and 8,509 completing students) in Australia have been collected. To date, overall eligible cohort response rates are 91% for commencing students, and 83% for completing students. Eighty three percent of completing medical student respondents had also completed a commencing questionnaire. Approximately 80% of medical students at Australian medical schools are Australian citizens. Australian medical schools have only small proportions of Indigenous students. One third of medical students speak a language other than English at home.The top three vocational choices for commencing medical students were surgery, paediatrics and child health and general practice. The top three vocational choices for completing students were surgery, adult medicine/ physician, and general practice. Overall, 75.7% of medical students changed their first career preference from commencement to exit from medical school. Most commencing and completing medical students wish to have their future medical practice in capital cities or in major urban centers. Only 8.1% of commencing students and 4.6% of completing students stated an intention to have their future medical practice in smaller towns and small communities. CONCLUSIONS The MSOD longitudinal project is now an established national resource that is beginning to generate significant research outputs, along with providing key information for workforce planning and policy makers. The project has now expanded to enrol New Zealand medical students.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityBaldeep Kaur, Angela Carberry, Nathaniel Hogan, Don Roberton and Justin Beilbyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.rights© 2014 Kaur et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en
dc.subjectMedical education; Medical workforce; Health; Medical student; Medical doctors; Longitudinal; Medicine; Methodology; Interns; Internshipen
dc.titleThe medical schools outcomes database project: Australian medical student characteristicsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030029739en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6920-14-180en
dc.identifier.pubid187570-
pubs.library.collectionMedicine publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS01en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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