Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/97676
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSmithers, L.-
dc.contributor.authorSearle, A.-
dc.contributor.authorChittleborough, C.-
dc.contributor.authorScheil, W.-
dc.contributor.authorBrinkman, S.-
dc.contributor.authorLynch, J.-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationBJOG: an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2015; 122(10):1303-1311-
dc.identifier.issn1470-0328-
dc.identifier.issn1471-0528-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/97676-
dc.description.abstractTo examine the risk of poor child development according to week of gestation at birth, among children born ≥ 37 weeks' gestation.Population-based study using linked data (n = 12,601).South Australia.All births ≥ 37 weeks' gestation.Relative risks of developmental vulnerability for each week of gestation were calculated with adjustment for confounders and addressing missing information.Child development was documented by teachers during a national census of children attending their first year of school in 2009, using the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI). Children scoring in the lowest 10% of the AEDI were categorised as developmentally vulnerable.The percentage of children vulnerable on one or more AEDI domains for the following gestational ages 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42-45 weeks was 24.8, 22.3, 20.6, 20.0, 20.4 and 24.2, respectively. Compared with children born at 40 weeks, the adjusted relative risks [(95% confidence interval (CI)] for vulnerability on ≥ 1 AEDI domain were; 37 weeks 1.13 (0.99-1.28), 38 weeks 1.05 (0.96-1.15), 39 weeks 1.02 (0.94-1.12), 41 weeks 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 42-45 weeks 1.20 (0.84-1.72).Children born at 40-41 weeks' gestation may have the lowest risk of developmental vulnerability at school entry, reinforcing the importance of term birth in perinatal care. Early term or post-term gestational age at birth can help clinicians, teachers and parents recognise children with potential developmental vulnerabilities at school entry.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityLG Smithers, AK Searle, CR Chittleborough, W Scheil, SA Brinkman and JW Lynch-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherWiley-
dc.rights© 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists-
dc.subjectChild Development-
dc.subjectGestational Age-
dc.titleA whole-of-population study of term and post-term gestational age at birth and children's development-
dc.typeJournal article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1471-0528.13324-
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1056888-
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/570120-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
dc.identifier.orcidSmithers, L. [0000-0002-6585-7836]-
dc.identifier.orcidSearle, A. [0000-0002-8602-0146]-
dc.identifier.orcidChittleborough, C. [0000-0003-3196-7137]-
dc.identifier.orcidBrinkman, S. [0000-0001-7538-4844]-
dc.identifier.orcidLynch, J. [0000-0003-2781-7902]-
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 3
Public Health publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.