Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/97975
Type: Conference paper
Title: Metabolism in the pre-implantation oocyte and embryo
Author: Sutton-McDowall, M.
Thompson, J.
Citation: Animal Reproduction, 2015 / vol.12, iss.3, pp.408-417
Publisher: Brazilian College of Animal Reproduction
Publisher Place: Brazil
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 1806-9614
1984-3143
Conference Name: 29th Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Embryo Technology Societym (SBTE) (20 Aug 2015 - 23 Aug 2015 : Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
M.L. Sutton-McDowall, J.G. Thompson
Abstract: An understanding of oocyte and embryo metabolism is critical to understanding and developing in vitro culture systems. In the last 60-70 years there has been a constant evolution in the way metabolism studies have been conducted. This includes a change from studying the metabolism of the oocyte alone vs. as a whole cumulus oocyte complex. The study of in vivo environments has lead to the creation of defined sequential culture systems, resulting in overcoming developmental blocks and improved embryo development. And techniques for studying metabolism have evolved from the use of radiolabelled isotopes to increasingly specific fluorescence probes and metabolomics, allowing for large, integrative profiles. Metabolism is a potential diagnostic for selecting the most likely embryos to implant. We envisage the future of metabolism will involve the ability to measure ‘more-in-less’ (more substrates, less volumes) and allow for a holistic approach to understanding the relationship between metabolism and developmental competence, as it is unconceivable that a single metabolic output will be able to assess health and/or quality.
Keywords: embryo; in vitro embryo production; metabolism; oocyte
Rights: © Animal Reproduction
RMID: 0030045178
Published version: http://www.cbra.org.br/portal/publicacoes/ar/2015/arjs2015.html
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.