Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/99930
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Type: Journal article
Title: Sarcopenia in older people
Author: Yu, S.
Umapathysivam, K.
Visvanathan, R.
Citation: International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, 2014; 12(4):227-243
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 1744-1595
1744-1609
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Solomon Yu, Kandiah Umapathysivam and Renuka Visvanathan
Abstract: Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength. It has been receiving international attention because of its increased prevalence in western societies, such as Australia, which have large and growing older populations. Adverse health consequences of sarcopenia are falls and loss of independence, increased health costs and reduced quality of life. Recently, there have been international attempts to come to a consensus with regards to a definition of the condition, and, increasingly, clinicians are being encouraged to screen and assess for sarcopenia. Screening pathways are being investigated and some are discussed in this review. There is an emphasis on early screening, as it is believed that early detection will allow early intervention. As with most conditions in older age, there are many environmental and medical factors that can contribute to the development and worsening of sarcopenia, and it is important that, when possible, these contributing factors be addressed. Pharmaceutical treatment strategies are under development with some early promise and there is the possibility of clinical trials in the near future. Currently, nutritional supplementation and physical therapy are the strategies advocated for the management of sarcopenia once it is diagnosed.
Keywords: aging; body composition; muscle mass; nutrition; sarcopenia
Rights: © 2014 University of Adelaide, Joanna Briggs Institute
RMID: 0030022733
DOI: 10.1097/XEB.0000000000000018
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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