Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/10262
Citations
Scopus Web of ScienceĀ® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Surgical techniques for the removal of frontal recess cells obstructing the frontal ostium
Author: Wormald, P.
Chan, S.
Citation: American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, 2003; 17(4):221-226
Publisher: Ocean Side Publications Inc
Issue Date: 2003
ISSN: 1945-8924
1050-6586
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Cells pneumatizing through the frontal ostium may vary in the degree of frontal sinus penetration. This series describes the use of the axillary flap technique and the endoscopic modified Lothrop procedure (EMLP) for the removal of cells that pneumatize to a varying degree through the frontal ostium into the frontal sinus. METHODS: Out of a total of 204 patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery, 31 patients had a cell on one side and 7 patients had bilateral obstructive cells resulting in 38 sides undergoing an axillary flap approach for the removal of the obstructing cell. In 13 patients, the obstructing cell was deemed inaccessible by conventional technique and these patients underwent an EMLP for removal of the obstructing cell. RESULTS: All patients who underwent both the axillary flap approach and the EMLP had a patent frontal ostium confirmed endoscopically at the last follow-up visit. However, 8 of the 38 sides (21%) that underwent the axillary flap procedure had residual minor symptoms with four patients (30%) who underwent an EMLP having a recurrence of minor symptoms CONCLUSION: The axillary flap and the EMLP can be used to remove successfully ethmoidal cells that have pneumatized through the frontal ostium.
Keywords: Frontal Sinus; Humans; Nasal Obstruction; Frontal Sinusitis; Treatment Outcome; Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures; Severity of Illness Index; Follow-Up Studies; Adult; Middle Aged; Female; Male
RMID: 0020030050
DOI: 10.1177/194589240301700408
Appears in Collections:Surgery publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.