Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/107431
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Type: Journal article
Title: Patient perceptions of innovative longitudinal integrated clerkships based in regional, rural and remote primary care: a qualitative study
Author: Hudson, J.
Knight, P.
Weston, K.
Citation: BMC Family Practice, 2012; 13(1):72-1-72-8
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1471-2296
1471-2296
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Judith N Hudson, Patricia J Knight and Kathryn M Weston
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Medical students at the University of Wollongong experience continuity of patient care and clinical supervision during an innovative year-long integrated (community and hospital) clinical clerkship. In this model of clinical education, students are based in a general practice 'teaching microsystem' and participate in patient care as part of this community of practice (CoP). This study evaluates patients' perceptions of the clerkship initiative, and their perspectives on this approach to training 'much-needed' doctors in their community. METHODS: Semi-structured, face-to-face, interviews with patients provided data on the clerkship model in three contexts: regional, rural and remote health care settings in Australia. Two researchers independently thematically analysed transcribed data and organised emergent categories into themes. RESULTS: The twelve categories that emerged from the analysis of transcribed data were clustered into four themes: learning as doing; learning as shared experience; learning as belonging to a community; and learning as 'becoming'. Patients viewed the clerkship learning environment as patient- and student-centred, emphasising that the patient-student-doctor relationship triad was important in facilitating active participation by patients as well as students. Patients believed that students became central, rather than peripheral, members of the CoP during an extended placement, value-adding and improving access to patient care. CONCLUSIONS: Regional, rural and remote patients valued the long-term engagement of senior medical students in their health care team(s). A supportive CoP such as the general practice 'teaching microsystem' allowed student and patient to experience increasing participation and identity transformation over time. The extended student-patient-doctor relationship was seen as influential in this progression. Patients revealed unique insights into the longitudinal clerkship model, and believed they have an important contribution to make to medical education and new strategies addressing mal-distribution in the medical workforce.
Keywords: Rural medical education; Longitudinal integrated clerkships; patient-centredness; patients as stakeholders
Rights: © 2012 Hudson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2296-13-72
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