Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/114964
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Type: Journal article
Title: Evidence for light-by-light scattering in heavy-ion collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC
Author: Aaboud, M.
Aad, G.
Abbott, B.
Abdallah, J.
Abdinov, O.
Abeloos, B.
Abidi, S.
AbouZeid, O.
Abraham, N.
Abramowicz, H.
Abreu, H.
Abreu, R.
Abulaiti, Y.
Acharya, B.
Adachi, S.
Adamczyk, L.
Adelman, J.
Adersberger, M.
Adye, T.
Affolder, A.
et al.
Citation: Nature Physics, 2017; 13(9):852-858
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 1745-2473
1745-2481
Statement of
Responsibility: 
M. Aaboud ... P. Jackson ... L. Lee ... A. Petridis ... M.J. White ... [et al.] (The ATLAS Collaboration)
Abstract: Light-by-light scattering (γγ → γγ) is a quantum-mechanical process that is forbidden in the classical theory of electrodynamics. This reaction is accessible at the Large Hadron Collider thanks to the large electromagnetic field strengths generated by ultra-relativistic colliding lead ions. Using 480 μb⁻¹ of lead–lead collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV by the ATLAS detector, here we report evidence for light-by-light scattering. A total of 13 candidate events were observed with an expected background of 2.6 ± 0.7 events. After background subtraction and analysis corrections, the fiducial cross-section of the process Pb + Pb (γγ) → Pb(∗) + Pb(∗)γγ, for photon transverse energy ET > 3 GeV, photon absolute pseudorapidity |η| < 2.4, diphoton invariant mass greater than 6 GeV, diphoton transverse momentum lower than 2 GeV and diphoton acoplanarity below 0.01, is measured to be 70 ± 24 (stat.) ± 17 (syst.) nb, which is in agreement with the standard model predictions.
Rights: © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0030077390
DOI: 10.1038/nphys4208
Appears in Collections:Physics publications

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