Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/12569
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Type: Journal article
Title: Short period fluctuations of the diurnal tide observed with low-altitude MF and meteor radars during CADRE: Evidence for gravity-wave/tidal interations
Author: Nakamura, T.
Fritts, D.
Isler, J.
Reid, I.
Tsuda, T.
Vincent, R.
Citation: Journal of Geophysical Research, 1997; 102(22):26225-26238
Publisher: AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION
Issue Date: 1997
ISSN: 0148-0227
2169-8996
Abstract: MF and meteor radar data from four equatorial and subtropical sites (Hawaii, Christmas Island, Jakarta, and Adelaide) are used to examine diurnal tide amplitude and phase variability at mesosphere and lower thermosphere altitudes. All sites exhibit significant seasonal variability, with the largest amplitude fluctuations occurring at Hawaii and Adelaide. Shorter-term variability is found to occur primarily on timescales of ∼5 to 30 days. Amplitude and phase fluctuations are well correlated among different sites on occasion, but in general, the amplitude and phase coherences are low and suggest significant local influences on the tidal structures. The temporal behavior of height variations of the diurnal tide amplitude and phase is also examined. Cross correlations and cross spectra of these tidal parameters, especially between the amplitude and phase, are examined closely. The tendency for phase maxima to lead amplitude maxima is consistent with tidal modulation of gravity wave propagation and momentum fluxes, with a corresponding feedback by the gravity wave momentum flux divergences on the observed tidal structures. These results substantially extend previous more limited studies of gravity wave/tidal interactions and provide a statistical basis for the possible importance of this interaction and its influences on the diurnal tidal structure.
DOI: 10.1029/96jd03145
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