Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/126430
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Type: Journal article
Title: The homologies and evolutionary reduction of the pelvis and hindlimbs in snakes, with the first report of ossified pelvic vestiges in an anomalepidid (Liotyphlops beui)
Author: Palci, A.
Hutchinson, M.N.
Caldwell, M.W.
Smith, K.T.
Lee, M.S.Y.
Citation: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2020; 188(2):630-652
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 0024-4082
1096-3642
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Alessandro Palci, Mark N. Hutchinson, Michael W. Caldwell, Krister T. Smith, and Michael S.Y. Lee
Abstract: We report the first example of ossified pelvic vestiges in an anomalepidid snake, Liotyplophs beui, and provide a review of the diversity of limb and pelvic elements within Serpentes. We trace the evolution, homology and reduction of the pelvic elements and hindlimbs from the oldest known snakes through to living forms. Evolutionary analysis of the pelvic and limb data shows that the most recent common ancestor of all living snakes (Serpentes) most probably retained all three pelvic elements and rudimentary hindlimbs (femoral spurs). Subsequently, there have been multiple losses of ossified pelvic and hindlimb elements and regaining of ossified pelvic elements. Reduction of the pelvis has followed different routes in the two primary groups of living snakes (scolecophidians and alethinophidians). The single remaining rod-like element in some scolecophidians is the ischium, whereas the single remaining rod-like element in many basal alethinophidians is the pubis. Notably, many basal alethinophidians share a distinctive configuration of cloacal spur (claw), femur and a sizeable pubis, which is likely to be related functionally to the widespread use of the hindlimbs in mating and courtship, rather than the usual representation of the bones as non-functional vestiges.
Keywords: Anatomy; evolution; homology; limb bones; phylogeny; postcranial skeleton; Serpentes
Rights: © 2019 The Linnean Society of London
DOI: 10.1093/zoolinnean/zlz098
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP160103005
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 8
Ecology, Evolution and Landscape Science publications

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