Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/16794
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dc.contributor.authorSanders, A.-
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, A.-
dc.contributor.authorStewart, J.-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dental Health, 2005; 22(3):133-140-
dc.identifier.issn0265-539X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/16794-
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2005 F D I World Dental Press-
dc.description.abstract<h4>Unlabelled</h4>While it is recognised that risk behaviours for general health tend to cluster among individuals, it is less clear whether risk behaviours for oral health co-occur among these same individuals.<h4>Objectives</h4>To describe the distribution of health-relevant behaviours in a population sample, to examine whether oral and general risk behaviours cluster among individuals and to identify population groups with a shared risk profile.<h4>Methods</h4>Self-reported data were obtained from a stratified random sample of adults aged 18+ who participated in the 2002 National Dental Telephone Interview Survey and completed a subsequent mailed questionnaire (n = 3,132). Data were weighted to represent a simple random sample of Australian adults and analysis was limited to dentate adults.<h4>Results</h4>Four oral health behaviours (toothbrushing frequency, interdental cleaning, exposure to non-milk extrinsic sugars, usual reason for a dental visit) and four general health behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, Body Mass Index) were dichotomised. K-means cluster analysis identified two readily interpretable groups that differed significantly on each behaviour apart from alcohol consumption (ANOVA; p = 0.77). A significant relationship emerged between cluster memberships and sociodemographic characteristics. Over-represented in the risk behaviour group (40.7% of the sample) were males, young adults, Australian born, those who did not live in a major city, adults who rented their housing and those adults with lower levels of education and household income (Chi square; p < 0.05).<h4>Conclusion</h4>The interrelatedness of oral and general risk behaviours and their sociodemographic associations supports the tailoring of integrated oral and general health promotion messages and services to targeted population groups.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilitySanders AE; Spencer AJ; and Stewart JF-
dc.description.urihttp://www.cdh.org.uk/abstracts/v22p133.html-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherF D I World Dental Press Ltd-
dc.subjectHumans-
dc.subjectOral Hygiene-
dc.subjectAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subjectCluster Analysis-
dc.subjectDental Care-
dc.subjectHealth Behavior-
dc.subjectRisk-Taking-
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.subjectAdolescent-
dc.subjectAdult-
dc.subjectAged-
dc.subjectMiddle Aged-
dc.subjectAustralia-
dc.subjectFemale-
dc.subjectMale-
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnaires-
dc.titleClustering of risk behaviours for oral and general health-
dc.typeJournal article-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 2
Dentistry publications

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