Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/22679
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Type: Journal article
Title: Positive and negative affect and oral health-related quality of life
Author: Brennan, D.
Singh, K.
Spencer, A.
Roberts-Thomson, K.
Citation: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2006; 4(83):1-10
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Issue Date: 2006
ISSN: 1477-7525
1477-7525
Organisation: Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health
Statement of
Responsibility: 
David S Brennan, Kiran A Singh, A John Spencer and Kaye F Roberts- Thomson
Abstract: Background: The aims of the study were to assess the impact of both positive (PA) and negative affect (NA) on self-reported oral health-related quality of life and to determine the effect of including affectivity on the relationship between oral health-related quality of life and a set of explanatory variables consisting of oral health status, socio-economic status and dental visiting pattern. Methods: A random sample of 45–54 year-olds from metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia was surveyed by mailed self-complete questionnaire during 2004–05 with up to four follow-up mailings of the questionnaire to non-respondents (n = 986 responded, response rate = 44.4%). Oral health-related quality of life was measured using OHIP-14 and affectivity using the Bradburn scale. Using OHIP-14 and subscales as the dependent variables, regression models were constructed first using oral health status, socio-economic characteristics and dental visit pattern and then adding PA and NA as independent variables, with nested models tested for change in R-squared values. Results: PA and NA exhibited a negative correlation of -0.49 (P < 0.01). NA accounted for a larger percentage of variance in OHIP-14 scores (3.0% to 7.3%) than PA (1.4% to 4.6%). In models that included both PA and NA, PA accounted for 0.2% to 1.1% of variance in OHIP-14 scores compared to 1.8% to 3.9% for NA. Conclusion: PA and NA both accounted for additional variance in quality of life scores, but did not substantially diminish the effect of established explanatory variables such as oral health status, socio-economic status and dental visit patterns.
Keywords: Humans; Tooth Diseases; Sickness Impact Profile; Questionnaires; Analysis of Variance; Dentures; Affect; Personality; Self Concept; Psychometrics; Quality of Life; Social Class; Middle Aged; Oral Health; Urban Population; Dental Health Services; South Australia; Female; Male
Rights: © 2006 Brennan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0020061483
DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-4-83
Published version: http://www.hqlo.com/content/4/1/83
Appears in Collections:Dentistry publications
Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health publications

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