Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58154
Type: Conference paper
Title: Strouhal number of naturally-oscillating triangular and circular jets
Author: Lee, S.
Lanspeary, P.
Nathan, G.
Citation: Proceedings of the 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference / P. Jacobs, T. McIntyre, M. Cleary, D. Buttsworth, D. Mee, R. Clements, R. Morgan, C. Lemckert (eds.), 3-7 December 2007: pp.447-450.
Publisher: University of Queensland
Publisher Place: CDROM
Issue Date: 2007
ISBN: 9781864998948
Conference Name: Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (16th : 2007 : Gold Coast, Australia)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
S. K. Lee, P. V. Lanspeary and G. J. Nathan
Abstract: A nozzle consisting of an abrupt expansion into a short open- ended tube can produce a naturally-excited oscillating-jet flow. The characteristics of the oscillating jet depend on jet-orifice to chamber expansion ratio (D/d1), chamber length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), and shape of the jet orifice. In experiments using water as a flow medium, air-bubble visualisation and signals from a pressure transducer show that a triangular-jet orifice produces aperiodic oscillation without a spectral peak. In contrast, oscillation of the circular jet has clearly visible periodicity and the spectrum has a broad peak. The circular and triangular orifices produce completely different dependence of Strouhal number on expansion ratio. For a circular orifice, Strouhal number is inversely proportional to (D/d1−1). For a triangular orifice, Strouhal number is directly proportional to (D/d1−1). The two curves intersect at an expansion ratio of 4.8, which is approximately the minimum possible expansion ratio for a circular oscillating jet.
Rights: Copyright status unknown
RMID: 0020076233
Description (link): http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view.php?pid=UQ:120835
Appears in Collections:Mechanical Engineering conference papers
Environment Institute Leaders publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.