Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/81073
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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, N.en
dc.contributor.authorHardy, B.en
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, S.en
dc.contributor.authorEnninghorst, N.en
dc.contributor.authorAttia, J.en
dc.contributor.authorOldmeadow, C.en
dc.contributor.authorBalogh, Z.en
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationArchives of Osteoporosis, 2013; 8(150):1-5en
dc.identifier.issn1862-3522en
dc.identifier.issn1862-3514en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/81073-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe the population-based longitudinal trends in incidence, 30-day mortality and length of stay of hip fracture patients in a tertiary referral trauma centre in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, and identify the factors associated with increased 30-day mortality. METHODS: A retrospective database and chart review was conducted to patients aged ≥65 years with a diagnosis of femoral neck or pertrochanteric fracture admitted to the John Hunter Hospital between 01 January 2002 and 30 December 2011. The main outcome measure was 30-day mortality; secondary outcome was acute length of stay. RESULTS: There were 4,269 eligible patients (427±20 per year) with hip fractures over the 10-year study period. The absolute incidence increased slightly (p=0.1) but the age-adjusted rate decreased (p≤0.0001). The average age (83.5±7.1 years) and percentage of females (73.7%) did not change. Length of stay increased by a factor of 2.5% per year (p<0.0001). Thirty-day mortality decreased from 12.3% in 2002 to 8.20% in 2011 (p=0.0008). Independent risk factors associated with increased 30-day mortality were longer admissions (p<0.0001), increased age (p=0.005), dementia (p=0.01), male gender (p<0.0001), higher American Society of Anaesthesiologists score (p<0.0001), and longer time to operating theatre (p=0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Despite the relative ageing of our population, a decrease in the age-standardised rate of fractured hip in elderly patients has seen the number of admissions remain unchanged in our institution from 2002 to 2011. There was a decrease in 30-day mortality, while length of stay increased.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityNicole Williams, Ben M. Hardy, Seth Tarrant, Natalie Enninghorst, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Zsolt J. Baloghen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer UKen
dc.rights© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2013en
dc.subjectHip fracture; Geriatric fractures; Fragility fractures; Low-energy fallsen
dc.titleChanges in hip fracture incidence, mortality and length of stay over the last decade in an Australian major trauma centreen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020132109en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11657-013-0150-3en
dc.identifier.pubid17832-
pubs.library.collectionOrthopaedics and Trauma publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidWilliams, N. [0000-0001-9451-4456]en
Appears in Collections:Orthopaedics and Trauma publications

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