Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/89613
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Type: Conference paper
Title: Ionospheric propagation effects for UHE neutrino detection with the lunar Cherenkov technique
Author: McFadden, R.
Ekers, R.
Bray, J.
Citation: Proceedings of the 32nd International Cosmic Ray Conference, ICRC 2011, 2011 / vol.4, pp.284-287
Publisher: Institute of High Energy Physics
Issue Date: 2011
ISBN: 9781634391382
Conference Name: 32nd International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC) (11 Aug 2011 - 18 Aug 2011 : Beijing, China)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Rebecca Mcfadden, Ron Ekers, Justin Bray
Abstract: Lunar Cherenkov experiments aim to detect nanosecond pulses of Cherenkov emission produced during UHE cosmic ray or neutrino interactions in the lunar regolith. Pulses from these interactions are dispersed, and therefore reduced in amplitude, during propagation through the Earth’s ionosphere. Pulse dispersion must therefore be corrected to maximise the received signal to noise ratio and subsequent chances of detection. The pulse dispersion characteristic may also provide a powerful signature to determine the lunar origin of a pulse and discriminate against pulses of terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI). This characteristic is parameterised by the instantaneous Total Electron Content (TEC) of the ionosphere and therefore an accurate knowledge of the ionospheric TEC provides an experimental advantage for the detection and identification of lunar Cherenkov pulses. We present a new method to calibrate the dispersive effect of the ionosphere on lunar Cherenkov pulses using lunar Faraday rotation measurements combined with geomagnetic field models.
Keywords: UHE Neutrino Detection; Lunar Cherenkov Technique; Detectors - telescopes; Ionosphere; Lunar Polarisation
Rights: Copyright status unknown
RMID: 0030022060
DOI: 10.7529/ICRC2011/V04/1322
Appears in Collections:Physics publications

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