Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/102093
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Type: Journal article
Title: Soil salinization
Author: Rengasamy, P.
Citation: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Environmental Science, 2016; OnlinePubl:1-33
Publisher: Oxford Uni Press
Issue Date: 2016
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Pichu Rengasamy
Abstract: Salt accumulation in soils, affecting agricultural productivity, environmental health, and the economy of the community, is a global phenomenon since the decline of ancient Mesopotamian civilization by salinity. The global distribution of salt-affected soils is estimated to be around 830 million hectares extending over all the continents, including Africa, Asia, Australasia, and the Americas. The concentration and composition of salts depend on several resources and processes of salt accumulation in soil layers. Major types of soil salinization include groundwater associated salinity, non–groundwater-associated salinity, and irrigation-induced salinity. There are several soil processes which lead to salt build-up in the root zone interfering with the growth and physiological functions of plants. Salts, depending on the ionic composition and concentration, can also affect many soil processes, such as soil water dynamics, soil structural stability, solubility of essential nutrients, and pH and pE of soil water—all indirectly hindering plant growth. The direct effect of salinity includes the osmotic effect affecting water and nutrient uptake and the toxicity or deficiency due to high concentration of certain ions. The plan of action to resolve the problems associated with soil salinization should focus on prevention of salt accumulation, removal of accumulated salts, and adaptation to a saline environment. Successful utilization of salinized soils needs appropriate soil and irrigation management and improvement of plants by breeding and genetic engineering techniques to tolerate different levels of salinity and associated abiotic stress.
Keywords: saline soil; dispersive soil; soil behavior; salt tolerance; soil management
Description: Online Publ July 2016
Rights: © Oxford University Press USA, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Personal use only; commercial use is strictly prohibited
RMID: 0030057265
DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780199389414.013.65
Published version: http://environmentalscience.oxfordre.com/
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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