Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/102210
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Type: Journal article
Title: Phylogeography of the antilopine wallaroo (Macropus antilopinus) across tropical northern Australia
Author: Wadley, J.
Fordham, D.
Thomson, V.
Ritchie, E.
Austin, J.
Citation: Ecology and Evolution, 2016; 6(22):8050-8061
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 2045-7758
2045-7758
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jessica J. Wadley, Damien A. Fordham, Vicki A. Thomson, Euan G. Ritchie and Jeremy J. Austin
Abstract: The distribution of antilopine wallaroo, Macropus antilopinus, is marked by a break in the species’ range between Queensland and the Northern Territory, coinciding with the Carpentarian barrier. Previous work on M. antilopinus revealed limited genetic differentiation between the Northern Territory and Queensland M. antilopinus populations across this barrier. The study also identified a number of divergent lineages in the Northern Territory, but was unable to elucidate any geographic structure. Here, we re-examine these results to (1) determine phylogeographic patterns across the range of M. antilopinus and (2) infer the biogeographic barriers associated with these patterns. The tropical savannahs of northern Australia: from the Cape York Peninsula in the east, to the Kimberley in the west. We examined phylogeographic patterns in M. antilopinus using a larger number of samples and three mtDNA genes: NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2, cytochrome b, and the control region. Two datasets were generated and analyzed: (1) a subset of samples with all three mtDNA regions concatenated together and (2) all samples for just control region sequences that included samples from the previous study. Analysis included generating phylogenetic trees based on Bayesian analysis and intraspecific median- joining networks. The contemporary spatial structure of M. antilopinus mtDNA lineages revealed five shallow clades and a sixth, divergent lineage. The genetic differences that we found between Queensland and Northern Territory M. antilopinus samples confirmed the split in the geographic distribution of the species. We also found weak genetic differentiation between Northern Territory samples and those from the Kimberley region of Western Australia, possibly due to the Kimberley Plateau–Arnhem Land barrier. Within the Northern Territory, two clades appear to be parapatric in the west, while another two clades are broadly sympatric across the Northern Territory. MtDNA diversity of M. antilopinus revealed an unexpectedly complex evolutionary history involving multiple sympatric and parapatric mtDNA clades across northern Australia. These phylogeographic patterns highlight the importance of investigating genetic variation across distributions of species and integrating this information into biodiversity conservation.
Keywords: Biogeographic barriers; Carpentarian; divergence; genetics; macropod; marsupial; tropical savannah
Description: First published online August 2016
Rights: © 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0030057194
DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2381
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1096427
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications

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