Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/112571
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Type: Journal article
Title: A high prevalence of zinc-but not iron-deficiency among women in Rural Malawi: a cross-sectional study
Author: Siyame, E.
Hurst, R.
Wawer, A.
Young, S.
Broadley, M.
Chilimba, A.
Ander, L.
Watts, M.
Chilima, B.
Gondwe, J.
Kang'ombe, D.
Kalimbira, A.
Fairweather-Tait, S.
Bailey, K.
Gibson, R.
Citation: International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research, 2014; 83(3):176-187
Publisher: VERLAG HANS HUBER
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0300-9831
1664-2821
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Edwin W. P. Siyame, Rachel Hurst, Anna A. Wawer, Scott D. Young, Martin R. Broadley, Allan D. C. Chilimba, Louise E. Ander, Michael J. Watts, Benson Chilima, Jellita Gondwe, Dalitso Kang, ombe, Alexander Kalimbira, Susan J. Fairweather-Tait, Karl B. Bailey and Rosalind S. Gibson
Abstract: Zinc deficiency is often associated with nutritional iron deficiency (ID), and may be exacerbated by low selenium status.To investigate risk of iron and zinc deficiency in women with contrasting selenium status.In a cross-sectional study, 1-day diet composites and blood samples were collected from self-selected Malawian women aged 18-50 years from low- (Zombwe) (n=60) and high-plant-available soil selenium (Mikalango) (n=60) districts. Diets were analyzed for trace elements and blood for biomarkers.Zinc deficiency (>90 %) was greater than ID anemia (6 %), or ID (5 %), attributed to diets low in zinc (median 5.7 mg/day) with high phytate:zinc molar ratios (20.0), but high in iron (21.0 mg/day) from soil contaminant iron. Zombwe compared to Mikalango women had lower (p<0.05) intakes of selenium (6.5 vs. 55.3 µg/day), zinc (4.8 vs. 6.4 mg/day), iron (16.6 vs. 29.6 mg/day), lower plasma selenium (0.72 vs. 1.60 µmol/L), and higher body iron (5.3 vs. 3.8 mg/kg), although plasma zinc was similar (8.60 vs. 8.87 µmol/L). Body iron and plasma zinc were positive determinants of hemoglobin.Risk of zinc deficiency was higher than ID and was shown not to be associated with selenium status. Plasma zinc was almost as important as body iron as a hemoglobin determinant.
Keywords: Malawi; women; diet composites; plasma Zn; Se status; body iron; anemia
Rights: © 2013 Hans Huber Publishers, Hogrefe AG, Bern
RMID: 0030084062
DOI: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000158
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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