Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117120
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Type: Journal article
Title: Factors that predict discharge recommendations following paediatric mild traumatic brain injury
Author: Roberts, R.
Bunting, J.
Pertini, M.
Citation: Brain Injury, 2017; 31(8):1109-1115
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 0269-9052
1362-301X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Rachel M. Roberts, Jessica Bunting and Mark Pertini
Abstract: Primary Objective: To investigate factors that predict discharge recommendations for children and adolescents who present to an Australian paediatric Emergency Department (ED) following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Research Design: Retrospective data base analysis. Methods: The study retrospectively analysed an ED database to test the relationship between injury risk factors (symptoms, Glasgow Coma Scale, prior TBI, mechanism of injury and Computed Tomography scan), non-injury risk factors (sex, age, socio-economic status (SES)) and discharge recommendations of 2807 children and adolescents (0-18 years) who presented to a children's hospital ED over a three year period with mTBI. Results: Univariate analyses indicated a statistically significant association of discharge recommendations with age, SES, mechanism of injury and vomiting. However, multivariate analyses indicated vomiting and mechanism of injury were the only statistically significant risk factor associated with discharge recommendations, when controlling for other risk factors. Conclusions: The current study suggests vomiting and mechanism of injury are the only risk factors predicting discharge recommendations for children and adolescents with mTBI.
Keywords: Child; adolescent; clinical management; mild traumatic brain injury; post-concussion syndrome
Rights: © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
RMID: 0030068977
DOI: 10.1080/02699052.2017.1291992
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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