Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/119420
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Type: Journal article
Title: Social variables predict gains in cognitive scores across the preschool years in children with birth weights 500 to 1250 grams
Author: Manley, B.
Roberts, R.
Doyle, L.
Schmidt, B.
Anderson, P.
Barrington, K.
Böhm, B.
Golan, A.
Van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, A.
Davis, P.
D'Ilario, J.
Cairnie, J.
Dix, J.
Adams, B.
Warriner, E.
Kim, M.
Argus, B.
Callanan, C.
Duff, J.
McDonald, M.
et al.
Citation: Journal of Pediatrics, 2015; 166(4):870-876.e2
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 0022-3476
1097-6833
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Brett J.Manley, Robin S.Roberts, Lex W.Doyle, Barbara Schmidt, Peter J.Anderson ... Ross R. Haslam ... et al. (on behalf of the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) Trial Investigators)
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent that social variables influence cognitive development of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants across the preschool years. STUDY DESIGN: Participants were VLBW (500-1250 g) children enrolled in the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity randomized trial between 1999 and 2004. We investigated the relationships between 4 potential social advantages: higher maternal education, higher paternal education, caregiver employment, and 2 biologic parents in the same home--and gain in cognitive scores. Cognitive assessments were performed at the corrected ages of 18 months (Mental Development Index score on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II) and 5 years (Full Scale IQ on the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence III). Cognitive gain was computed by subtracting each individual 18-month Mental Development Index score from the corresponding Full Scale IQ at 5 years. RESULTS: Data were available for 1347 children. Mean (SD) cognitive scores were 90.8 (15.7) at 18 months and 98.9 (14.5) at 5 years. Multivariable regression showed that higher maternal education, higher paternal education, and caregiver employment had independent and additive effects of similar size on cognitive gain (P < .001); the mean cognitive gain between 18 months and 5 years increased by 3.6 points in the presence of each of these advantages. When all 3 were present, cognitive scores improved on average by 10.9 points compared with children without any of these advantages. CONCLUSION: In VLBW children, a count of 3 social advantages strongly predicts gains in cognitive scores across the preschool years.
Keywords: Retrospective Studies
Rights: © 2015 Elsevier Inc.All rights reserved.
RMID: 0030037746
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.12.016
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/108706
Appears in Collections:Paediatrics publications

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