Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/124155
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Type: Journal article
Title: Food advertising on Australian television: Frequency, duration and monthly pattern of advertising from a commercial network (four channels) for the entire 2016
Author: Smithers, L.
Haag, D.
Agnew, B.
Lynch, J.
Sorell, M.
Citation: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2018; 54(9):962-967
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1034-4810
1440-1754
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Lisa G Smithers, Dandara G Haag, Benjamin Agnew, John Lynch and Matthew Sorell
Abstract: Aim: To estimate the frequency, duration and monthly pattern of discretionary food advertising on Australian free-to-air television. Methods: We logged 30 000 h of television collected in Adelaide during 2016 from one network that has four channels. The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating was used to identify discretionary foods. Data were examined according to all times, to children’s peak viewing times (PVTs) and to when C-(children’s) rated programmes may be broadcast. Results: Of the >800 000 advertisements logged during 2016, 11% were for foods (n = 97 837). The most frequently advertised products were: snack foods (e.g. crisps), crumbed/battered meats, fast foods/take away meals and sweetened beverages. The frequency and duration of discretionary food advertising was 1.7 times/h and 0.5 min/h respectively at all times. During children’s PVTs, the frequency and duration of discretionary food advertising was 2.3 times/h and 0.7 min/h, respectively. When C-rated programmes can be broadcast, the frequency and duration of discretionary food advertising was 1.8 times/h and 0.6 min/h, respectively. Across the year, discretionary foods ranged between 41% (August) and 71% (January) of all food advertising. Conclusions: Discretionary foods dominate food advertising. On average, discretionary food advertising was higher during PVTs for children and during the summer school holidays (January).
Keywords: advertising; child; food and beverage; television
Rights: © 2018 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians)
RMID: 0030085612
DOI: 10.1111/jpc.13929
Appears in Collections:Electrical and Electronic Engineering publications

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