Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/27786
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Type: Journal article
Title: Increased congruence does not necessarily indicate increased phylogenetic accuracy - The behavior of the incongruence length difference test in mixed-model analyses
Author: Dowton, M.
Austin, A.
Citation: Systematic Biology, 2002; 51(1):19-31
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd
Issue Date: 2002
ISSN: 1063-5157
1076-836X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Mark Dowton and Andrew D. Austin
Abstract: Comprehensive phylogenetic analyses utilize data from distinct sources, including nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid molecular sequences and morphology. Such heterogeneous datasets are likely to require distinct models of analysis, given the different histories of mutational biases operating on these characters. The incongruence length difference (ILD) test is increasingly being used to arbitrate between competing models of phylogenetic analysis in cases where multiple data partitions have been collected. Our work suggests that the ILD test is unlikely to be an effective measure of congruence when two datasets differ markedly in size. We show that models that increase the contribution of one data partition over another are likely to increase congruence, as measured by this test. More alarmingly, for many bipartition comparisons, character congruence increases bimodally - either increasing or decreasing the contribution of one data partition will increase congruence - making it impossible to arrive at a single optimally congruent model of analysis.
Keywords: Animals; Hymenoptera; Electron Transport Complex IV; DNA, Ribosomal; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Phylogeny; Genes, Insect; Models, Genetic; Databases, Nucleic Acid
Description: © 2002 Taylor & Francis
RMID: 0020020508
DOI: 10.1080/106351502753475853
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications
Environment Institute Leaders publications

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