Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/34232
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Type: Journal article
Title: Rise and fall of the Beringian steppe bison
Author: Shapiro, B.
Drummond, A.
Rambaut, A.
Wilson, M.
Matheus, P.
Sher, A.
Pybus, O.
Gilbert, M.
Barnes, I.
Binladen, J.
Willerslev, E.
Hansen, A.
Baryshnikov, G.
Burns, J.
Davydov, S.
Driver, J.
Froese, D.
Harington, C.
Keddie, G.
Kosintsev, P.
et al.
Citation: Science, 2004; 306(5701):1561-1565
Publisher: Amer Assoc Advancement Science
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0036-8075
1095-9203
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Beth Shapiro, Alexei J. Drummond, Andrew Rambaut, Michael C. Wilson, Paul E. Matheus, Andrei V. Sher, Oliver G. Pybus, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Ian Barnes, Jonas Binladen, Eske Willerslev, Anders J. Hansen, Gennady F. Baryshnikov, James A. Burns, Sergei Davydov, Jonathan C. Driver, Duane G. Froese, C. Richard Harington, Grant Keddie, Pavel Kosintsev, Michael L. Kunz, Larry D. Martin, Robert O. Stephenson, John Storer, Richard Tedford, Sergei Zimov, and Alan Cooper
Abstract: The widespread extinctions of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene epoch have often been attributed to the depredations of humans; here we present genetic evidence that questions this assumption. We used ancient DNA and Bayesian techniques to reconstruct a detailed genetic history of bison throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. Our analyses depict a large diverse population living throughout Beringia until around 37,000 years before the present, when the population's genetic diversity began to decline dramatically. The timing of this decline correlates with environmental changes associated with the onset of the last glacial cycle, whereas archaeological evidence does not support the presence of large populations of humans in Eastern Beringia until more than 15,000 years later.
Keywords: Animals; Bison; Humans; DNA, Mitochondrial; Bayes Theorem; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Genetics, Population; Environment; Climate; Population Dynamics; Phylogeny; Time; Fossils; Human Activities; North America; Canada; Alaska; China; Genetic Variation
Description: Copyright © 2004 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science
RMID: 0020063661
DOI: 10.1126/science.1101074
Published version: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/306/5701/1561
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications
Australian Centre for Ancient DNA publications
Environment Institute Leaders publications

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