Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/35131
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Type: Journal article
Title: Multiplexed SNP typing of ancient DNA clarifies the origin of Andaman mtDNA haplogroups amongst South Asian tribal populations
Author: Endicott, P.
Metspalu, M.
Stringer, C.
Macaulay, V.
Cooper, A.
Sanchez, J.
Citation: PLoS One, 2006; 1(1):1-8
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Issue Date: 2006
ISSN: 1932-6203
1932-6203
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Phillip Endicott, Mait Metspalu, Chris Stringer, Vincent Macaulay, Alan Cooper, Juan J. Sanchez
Abstract: The issue of errors in genetic data sets is of growing concern, particularly in population genetics where whole genome mtDNA sequence data is coming under increased scrutiny. Multiplexed PCR reactions, combined with SNP typing, are currently under-exploited in this context, but have the potential to genotype whole populations rapidly and accurately, significantly reducing the amount of errors appearing in published data sets. To show the sensitivity of this technique for screening mtDNA genomic sequence data, 20 historic samples of the enigmatic Andaman Islanders and 12 modern samples from three Indian tribal populations (Chenchu, Lambadi and Lodha) were genotyped for 20 coding region sites after provisional haplogroup assignment with control region sequences. The genotype data from the historic samples significantly revise the topologies for the Andaman M31 and M32 mtDNA lineages by rectifying conflicts in published data sets. The new Indian data extend the distribution of the M31a lineage to South Asia, challenging previous interpretations of mtDNA phylogeography. This genetic connection between the ancestors of the Andamanese and South Asian tribal groups ~30 kya has important implications for the debate concerning migration routes and settlement patterns of humans leaving Africa during the late Pleistocene, and indicates the need for more detailed genotyping strategies. The methodology serves as a low-cost, high-throughput model for the production and authentication of data from modern or ancient DNA, and demonstrates the value of museum collections as important records of human genetic diversity.
Keywords: Humans; DNA, Mitochondrial; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Genetics, Population; Phylogeny; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; History, Ancient; History, 19th Century; Asian Continental Ancestry Group; India
Description: © 2006 Endicott et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
RMID: 0020063029
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000081
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications
Australian Centre for Ancient DNA publications
Environment Institute Leaders publications

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