Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/38042
Citations
Scopus Web of ScienceĀ® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: A molecular analysis of dietary diversity for three archaic Native Americans
Author: Poinar, H.
Kuch, M.
Sobolik, K.
Barnes, I.
Stankiewicz, A.
Kuder, T.
Spaulding, W.
Bryant, V.
Cooper, A.
Paabo, S.
Citation: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2001; 98(8):4317-4322
Publisher: Natl Acad Sciences
Issue Date: 2001
ISSN: 0027-8424
1091-6490
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Hendrik N. Poinar, Melanie Kuch, Kristin D. Sobolik, Ian Barnes, Artur B. Stankiewicz, Tomasz Kuder, W. Geofferey Spaulding, Vaughn M. Bryant, Alan Cooper, and Svante Paabo
Abstract: DNA was extracted from three fecal samples, more than 2,000 years old, from Hinds Cave, Texas. Amplification of human mtDNA sequences showed their affiliation with contemporary Native Americans, while sequences from pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep, and cottontail rabbit allowed these animals to be identified as part of the diet of these individuals. Furthermore, amplification of chloroplast DNA sequences identified eight different plants as dietary elements. These archaic humans consumed 2-4 different animal species and 4-8 different plant species during a short time period. The success rate for retrieval of DNA from paleofeces is in strong contrast to that from skeletal remains where the success rate is generally low. Thus, human paleofecal remains represent a source of ancient DNA that significantly complements and may in some cases be superior to that from skeletal tissue.
Keywords: Feces; Animals; Humans; DNA, Mitochondrial; Diet; Base Sequence; Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid; Fossils; Molecular Sequence Data; Indians, North American; Texas; Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
RMID: 0020071365
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.061014798
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications
Environment Institute Leaders publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.