Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/51674
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Type: Journal article
Title: Hyaluronan synthesis and degradation in cartilage and bone
Author: Bastow, E.
Byers, S.
Golub, S.
Clarkin, C.
Pitsillides, A.
Fosang, A.
Citation: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 2008; 65(3):395-413
Publisher: Birkhauser Verlag Ag
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 1420-682X
1569-1632
Statement of
Responsibility: 
E. R. Bastow, S. Byers, S. B. Golub, C. E. Clarkin, A. A. Pitsillides and A. J. Fosang
Abstract: Hyaluronan (HA) is a large but simple glycosaminoglycan composed of repeating D-glucuronic acid, β1–3 linked to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine β1–4, found in body fluids and tissues, in both intra- and extracellular compartments. Despite its structural simplicity, HA has diverse functions in skeletal biology. In development, HA-rich matrices facilitate migration and condensation of mesenchymal cells, and HA participates in joint cavity formation and longitudinal bone growth. In adult cartilage, HA binding to aggrecan immobilises aggrecan, retaining it at the high concentrations required for compressive resilience. HA also appears to regulate bone remodelling by controlling osteoclast, osteoblast and osteocyte behaviour. The functions of HA depend on its intrinsic properties, which in turn rely on the degree of polymerisation by HA synthases, depolymerisation by hyaluronidases, and interactions with HA-binding proteins. HA synthesis and degradation are closely regulated in skeletal tissues and aberrant synthetic or degradative activity causes disease. The role and regulation of HA synthesis and degradation in cartilage, bone and skeletal development is discussed.
Keywords: Hyaluronan; hyaluronan synthase; hyaluronidase; cartilage; bone; growth plate; skeletal development; limb morphogenesis
RMID: 0020080210
DOI: 10.1007/s00018-007-7360-z
Appears in Collections:Molecular and Biomedical Science publications

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