Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/69125
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Type: Journal article
Title: An audit of first aid treatment of paediatric burns patients and their clinical outcome
Author: Cuttle, L.
Kravchuk, O.
Wallis, B.
Kimble, R.
Citation: Journal of Burn Care Research, 2009; 30(6):1028-1034
Publisher: Mosby Inc
Issue Date: 2009
ISSN: 1559-047X
1559-0488
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Leila Cuttle, Olena Kravchuk, Belinda Wallis and Roy M. Kimble
Abstract: This study describes the first aid used and clinical outcomes of all patients who presented to the Royal Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia in 2005 with an acute burn injury. A retrospective audit was performed with the charts of 459 patients and information concerning burn injury, first-aid treatment, and clinical outcomes was collected. First aid was used on 86.1% of patients, with 8.7% receiving no first aid and unknown treatment in 5.2% of cases. A majority of patients had cold water as first aid (80.2%), however, only 12.1% applied the cold water for the recommended 20 minutes or longer. Recommended first aid (cold water for >=20 minutes) was associated with significantly reduced reepithelialization time for children with contact injuries (P = .011). Superficial depth burns were significantly more likely to be associated with the use of recommended first aid (P = .03). Suboptimal treatment was more common for children younger than 3.5 years (P < .001) and for children with friction burns. This report is one of the few publications to relate first-aid treatment to clinical outcomes. Some positive clinical outcomes were associated with recommended first-aid use; however, wound outcomes were more strongly associated with burn depth and mechanism of injury. There is also a need for more public awareness of recommended first-aid treatment.
Keywords: Humans; Burns; Treatment Outcome; First Aid; Logistic Models; Chi-Square Distribution; Retrospective Studies; Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Infant; Medical Audit; Queensland; Female; Male
Rights: Copyright: © 2009 The American Burn Association
RMID: 0020114332
DOI: 10.1097/BCR.0b013e3181bfb7d1
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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