Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/77395
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Conference paper
Title: Approximate algorithms for survivable network design
Author: Shen, H.
Citation: Proceedings of the 2012 Third International Conference on Networking and Computing, held in Naha, Okinawa, Japan, 5-7 December, 2012: pp.9-18
Publisher: IEEE
Publisher Place: USA
Issue Date: 2012
ISBN: 9781467346245
Conference Name: International Conference on Networking and Computing (3rd : 2012 : Naha, Okinawa, Japan)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Hong Shen
Abstract: Along with the rapid development of network communication technology and the explosive growth of the internet applications, network reliability appears increasingly important to both traditional areas such as defense, finance and power industry, and emerging areas such as trusted computing, cloud computing and next-generation Internet. An interesting subject that has attracted great effort is how to design network topologies with a minimum network resource usage in terms of cost that provides a relibility guarantee. As problems on this subject, like most other network optimization problems, are well-known NP-hard even in their simplest form, design of effective solutions with a guaranteed approximation ratio from the optimal solution has been a major research focus of great significance for both theory and applications. This survery summarizes major existing techniques and results for solving some central problems in designing survivable networks including the minimal connected subgraph problem, the survivable network design problem and the Steiner minimal network problem.
Keywords: Approximation algorithm; Euler walk; Steiner minimal network; connected spanning subgraph; disjoint path pair; survivable network design; terminal spanning-tree
Rights: © 2012 IEEE
RMID: 0020126743
DOI: 10.1109/ICNC.2012.11
Appears in Collections:Computer Science publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.