Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/90071
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Chromosomal instability causes sensitivity to metabolic stress
Author: Shaukat, Z.
Liu, D.
Choo, A.
Hussain, R.
O'Keefe, L.
Richards, R.
Saint, R.
Gregory, S.
Citation: Oncogene, 2014; 34(31):4044-4055
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0950-9232
1476-5594
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Z Shaukat, D Liu, A Choo, R Hussain, L O’Keefe, R Richards, R Saint and SL Gregory
Abstract: Chromosomal INstability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer, refers to cells with an increased rate of gain or loss of whole chromosomes or chromosome parts. CIN is linked to the progression of tumors with poor clinical outcomes such as drug resistance. CIN can give tumors the diversity to resist therapy, but it comes at the cost of significant stress to tumor cells. To tolerate this, cancer cells must modify their energy use to provide adaptation against genetic changes as well as to promote their survival and growth. In this study, we have demonstrated that CIN induction causes sensitivity to metabolic stress. We show that mild metabolic disruption that does not affect normal cells, can lead to high levels of oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in CIN cells because they are already managing elevated stress levels. Altered metabolism is a differential characteristic of cancer cells, so our identification of key regulators that can exploit these changes to cause cell death may provide cancer-specific potential drug targets, especially for advanced cancers that exhibit CIN.
Keywords: Embryo, Nonmammalian; Animals; Animals, Genetically Modified; Drosophila melanogaster; Neoplasms; DNA Damage; Chromosomal Instability; Reactive Oxygen Species; Glutathione; Apoptosis; Lipid Peroxidation; Oxidative Stress; Stress, Physiological
Rights: © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited
RMID: 0030012968
DOI: 10.1038/onc.2014.344
Appears in Collections:Genetics publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.