Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/90540
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Type: Journal article
Title: Predicting support for social action: how values, justice-related variables, discrete emotions, and outcome expectations influence support for the Stolen Generations
Author: Feather, N.
Woodyatt, L.
McKee, I.
Citation: Motivation and Emotion, 2012; 36(4):516-528
Publisher: Springer US
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0146-7239
1573-6644
Statement of
Responsibility: 
N. T. Feather, Lydia Woodyatt, Ian R. McKee
Abstract: The Stolen Generations are Indigenous Australians who were taken from their homes by the State and placed in children’s homes or foster care. This study investigated relations between the values held by Non-Indigenous Australians and willingness to support a hypothetical organization set up to repair the damage caused. Participants (N = 235) completed the Schwartz Portrait Values Questionnaire followed by items concerning their perceived responsibility; Indigenous deservingness; feelings of pleasure, anger, guilt, regret, shame, and sympathy; their support for the organization; and how efficacious they expected their support would be. It was found at the bivariate level that support was positively associated with self-transcendence values (universalism, benevolence) and negatively associated with both self-enhancement (power, achievement, hedonism) and security values. A path analysis implied that universalism values influenced support via the justice-related variables of perceived responsibility and undeserved treatment, outcome expectations, negative emotions, and sympathy. This study contributes new information about the effects of values on personal willingness to repair past wrongs.
Keywords: Values
Justice
Emotions
Outcome expectations
Social action
Rights: © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011
DOI: 10.1007/s11031-011-9262-5
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 7
Psychology publications

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