Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/95718
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Type: Journal article
Title: The effect of seam imperfections on the unsteady flow within a fluid-filled torus
Author: Calabretto, S.
Mattner, T.
Denier, J.
Citation: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2015; 767:240-253
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 0022-1120
1469-7645
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Sophie A.W. Calabretto, Trent W. Mattner and James P. Denier
Abstract: We consider the behaviour of the flow within a fluid-filled torus when there is a sudden change in the rotation rate of the torus. Experimental work on this problem by Madden & Mullin (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 265, 1994, p. 217) demonstrated a flow with a rich and complex dynamics. In particular, planar (top-down) flow visualisation images show a well-defined laminar band at both the inner and outer bend of the toroidal pipe. Hewitt et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 688, 2011, pp. 88–119) demonstrated the existence of finite-time singularities in the resulting viscous boundary layers, and linked the post-singularity structure to one of the laminar bands identified in experiments (Madden & Mullin J. Fluid Mech., vol. 265, 1994, p. 217; del Pino et al. Phys. Fluids, vol. 20 (12), 2008, 124104). The second band (or laminar front) identified by Madden & Mullin was conjectured by Hewitt et al. to be the result of a centrifugal instability, perhaps generated by small imperfections in the experimental apparatus. Here we explore this conjecture further, demonstrating that a small seam imperfection can generate substantial secondary motion but with considerably different dynamics than the centrifugally driven instability of Hewitt et al.
Keywords: Boundary layers; boundary layer separation; boundary layer stability
Rights: © Cambridge University Press 2015
RMID: 0030023070
DOI: 10.1017/jfm.2015.46
Appears in Collections:Mathematical Sciences publications

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